Green Party policy on Europe – correcting a common misconception

  The Green Party position on Europe is not remotely ‘Euro-sceptical’. We are an internationalist and pro-European Party. The European Green Party is the closest thing that there is to a genuine pan-European political Party (a new ‘International’, one might say): the Green MEPs vote together much more often that other groups in the Euro-Parl.
  What the Green Party in this country is is deeply critical of existing European institutions, which are profoundly undemocratic, overly centrist, and deeply prejudiced toward big business. This is why we opposed the Lisbon Treaty. Any self-respecting leftwing / radical Party would take a similar view – which is why New Labour did not, presumably…

6 thoughts on “Green Party policy on Europe – correcting a common misconception”

  1. Rupert you say “Green MEPs vote together much more often that other groups in the Euro-Parliament” which is true, then you say “we opposed the Lisbon Treaty. Any self-respecting leftwing / radical Party would take a similar view” On the Lisbon Treaty the European Green Party voted in favour. Danny Cohn-Bendit an absolute enthusiast. Cohn-Bendit said the countries who would vote No should be compelled to hold a second referendum, and in case of a second No, should be expelled from the EU. Are you sure you don’t want to rethink this.

  2. Why not express your opposition to Lisbon in terms of measures that are actually in the treaty. You would probably be the first ever opponent to do so.

  3. David – Danny to my knowledge does not represent the Green Party of the UK, and further more I’ll think you’ll find that he singled himself out by saying that. Danny is a controversial character and is probably not a good representative of the Greens and other self respecting leftists. Rupert’s clarificatory statement about the Green’s position still stands in my view. And I agree and support the Green’s approach – we must work together internationally, however only a reformed and much more democratic EU will be able to facilitate the progressive change that is needed.

  4. Jon, Rupert said “The European Green Party is the closest thing that there is to a genuine pan-European political Party” Danny is a controversial character, nevertheless he is de facto co-leader of the European Green Party. There is no Green Party of the UK, there were three Green Parties contesting the General Elections two were opposed to Lisbon one was in favour.

    I accept the Green Party of England and Wales could fairly be described as left and radical, but opposition to Lisbon is nothing to do with being left and radical, there are plenty of right and reactionary, and even a few centre and moderate folk opposed to Lisbon. It’s rather a shame that Greens who used to be beyond the one dimensional politics of left and right, now seem completely chained to it.

  5. David, I think you are missing the point. R did not say that only left wing/ radical groups would have reason to oppose the Lisbon Treaty, and beforehand states the specific reasons why the Green Party (in my country) opposed it. The last comment was a dig at Labour abandoning its traditional values. You can respond to the effect that this was not well put, but you would be nitpicking.

    And my point to you still stands – nothing Cohn-Bendit says detracts from anything Rupert has said in this post.

  6. Thanks Jon.
    Thanks too, David. Of course you are right that the European Green Party was internally divided, big-style, on the Lisbon Treaty. But that hardly undermines what I have said. The main point of what I said, in any case, was (as Jon says) about the British political scene, in relation to the issue of Europe.

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